Jean Augustine

Jean Augustine

Jean Augustine: In 1993, Canadian politician Jean Augustine became the first Black woman elected to the Parliament of Canada.

  • During her years as a federal member of parliament, The Honourable Jean Augustine has been the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister of Canada, Chair of the National Liberal Women’s Caucus, Secretary of State for Multiculturalism and the Status of Women, Chair of the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and Deputy Speaker.
  • The mother of two daughters, Jean Augustine is the recipient of numerous awards–including the 1994 Canadian Black Achievement Award, the YWCA Woman of Distinction and the Kaye Livingstone Award for support of issues relating to Black women. Ms. Augustine has worked on many intiatives related to youth, noting that “racism is the most significant barrier to the successful integration of newcomer black youths to Canada”.
John Hope Franklin: (2 January 1915 – 25 March 2009)

John Hope Franklin: (2 January 1915 – 25 March 2009)

John Hope Franklin: (2 January 1915 – 25 March 2009)

John Hope Franklin was a United States historian and past president of Phi Beta Kappa. Franklin is best known for his work From Slavery to Freedom, first published in 1947, and continually updated. More than three million copies have been sold. In 1995, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor.

  • Professor Franklin served on many national commissions and delegations, including the National Council on the Humanities.
  • Professor Franklin was the recipient of many honors. In 1978, Who’s Who in America selected Dr. Franklin as one of eight Americans who has made significant contributions to society.
  • Professor Franklin died of congestive heart failure at Duke Hospital on the morning of March 25th, 2009.
Mathieu Da Costa

Mathieu Da Costa

Mathieu Da Costa:  It is thought that he came to Canada at some time before 1603, and died 1698.

Mathieu Da Costa was the first namable person of African descent to come to Canada. He was one of the most fascinating (and elusive) figures in early Canadian history.
Mathieu Da Costa was a navigator and interpreter of African descent who likely travelled extensively throughout the Atlantic world in the late 1500s and early 1600s.
Mathieu Da Costa is the start of Black Canadian culture and heritage.

Emperor Haile Selassie

Emperor Haile Selassie

Emperor Haile Selassie:(23 July 1892 – 27 August 1975)

Haile Selassie’s influence on the world is his most enduring legacy.
The Emperor established the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) in 1963, with a headquarters in Addis Ababa.
Haile Selassie was a people person.

  • In October 1935, The Italian army, with order from Mussolini, invaded northern part of Ethiopia i.e. Adigrat, Adwa and Mekele. Haile Selassie appealed to the League of Nations of which Ethiopia is a member state, but his appeal was completely ignored. The League of Nations, especially Britain and France, turned a blind eye to what was happening in Ethiopia, effectively giving Italy a green light to occupy Ethiopia.
Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr.:(17 August 1887 – 10 June 1940)

Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr.:(17 August 1887 – 10 June 1940)

Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr.:(17 August 1887 – 10 June 1940)

Marcus Garvey was born in St. Ann’s Bay, Jamaica, on 17th August, 1887. After seven years of schooling he worked as a printer. He became an active trade unionist and in 1907 was elected vice president of compositors’ branch of the printers’ union. He helped lead a printer’s strike (1908-09) and after it collapsed the union disintegrated.
*In 1911 Garvey moved to England and briefly studied at Birbeck College where he met other blacks who were involved in the struggle to obtain independence from the British Empire.
Garvey arrived in the United States on 23rd March 1916
*In 1919 Garvey formed the Black Cross Navigation and Trading Company
*In 1928 Garvey went on a lecture tour of Britain, France, Belgium, Switzerland and Canada. On Garvey’s return to Jamaica he established the People’s Political Party and a new daily newspaper, The Blackman. The project was not a success and in March, 1935, Garvey moved to England where he published The Tragedy of White Injustice. Marcus Garvey continued to hold UNIA conventions and to tour the world making speeches on civil rights until his death in London on 10th June, 1940.